Syrian refugees
Internally displaced South Sudanese mother Antenate (centre) sits with three of her five children, on the spot where they sleep outside in the Protection of Civilians (PoC) site adjacent to the UNMISS base in Wau, Western Bahr el Ghazal, South Sudan, Friday 16 June 2017. “Soldiers came and started shooting people,” says Antenate, who walked for two days to reach the camp. Her brother, her husband, and her uncle were all shot. “We had nothing. Everything you see here we got here,” says Antenate of her few possessions.

Six years after independence, the hopes and dreams of this fledgling nation have been shattered by armed conflict. Two million people are displaced within South Sudan’s borders, and another two million have fled the country, inflicting unthinkable hardship and suffering. When clashes broke out in Wau in June 2016, thousands of people sought shelter at the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS) base on the edge of town and at St. Mary’s cathedral. As of June 2017, 48,000 people live between the two sites, unable to return home, relying on aid agencies for their most basic needs.

Living conditions in Wau’s Protection of Civilians (PoC) site are cramped – it is the most densely populated of the six PoC sites in South Sudan. There are 39,165 internally displaced persons (IDPs) sheltering on just 200,000 m2 of land - 5 m2 per person, well below the Sphere standard of 30 m2 per person. St. Mary’s cathedral is equally cramped, with a surge in new arrivals in April 2017 adding further pressure. Some 8,800 internally displaced South Sudanese currently live on the grounds of the cathedral. 

As the rainy season approaches, drainage is vitally important to ensure sanitary living conditions for the displaced. UNICEF and partners are working on sanitation, hygiene and drainage in the PoC site. A cholera outbreak has reached many parts of South Sudan, and staff in the camp are working on preventing the spread of disease i
22
Nov

Uplifting Women and Girls Is the Key to Solving the World’s Problems

By Mansi Mehta, Manager, Global Cause Partnerships

Prevent gender-based violence in South Sudan:

On February 20, 2017, famine was declared in South Sudan, deepening the already existing humanitarian crisis in the region. Today, more than 2 million people have been displaced by violence in South Sudan. Of those fleeing the conflict, 87 percent are women and children, meaning 1.3 million children need our help to protect their childhood.

Women and children are facing immediate risks of violence, displacement, life-threatening diseases and hunger. In addition to this, Details

Manar, 34 years old, buying winter clothes for her children at a shop in Za’atari camp with the cash support from UNICEF.
20
Nov

Solving Problems That Seem Too Big

When the temperatures recently dropped, I enjoyed an evening curling up by the fire to read to my family after filling our bellies with great food (happily, my husband does most of the cooking).  Warmth, shelter, safety, food, family connection. These are simple pleasures in life that I know not to take for granted and I know that other Dining for Women members don’t either. Details

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29
Oct

Syrian Refugee Crisis: A Firsthand Perspective

It is devastating to see and read about the Syrian refugee families, and I find myself searching constantly for more information, more perspective. Dining for Women’s featured program in January was the Collateral Repair Project (CRP), which helps refugees living in Jordan. Our $37,000 grant is being used to provide psychosocial and wellness programs as well as leadership training for refugee women, many of whom have escaped from the conflict in Syria. I wanted to loop back with CRP to dig a little deeper into the perspective of the refugees and the future. Details