Impact
Internally displaced South Sudanese mother Antenate (centre) sits with three of her five children, on the spot where they sleep outside in the Protection of Civilians (PoC) site adjacent to the UNMISS base in Wau, Western Bahr el Ghazal, South Sudan, Friday 16 June 2017. “Soldiers came and started shooting people,” says Antenate, who walked for two days to reach the camp. Her brother, her husband, and her uncle were all shot. “We had nothing. Everything you see here we got here,” says Antenate of her few possessions.

Six years after independence, the hopes and dreams of this fledgling nation have been shattered by armed conflict. Two million people are displaced within South Sudan’s borders, and another two million have fled the country, inflicting unthinkable hardship and suffering. When clashes broke out in Wau in June 2016, thousands of people sought shelter at the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS) base on the edge of town and at St. Mary’s cathedral. As of June 2017, 48,000 people live between the two sites, unable to return home, relying on aid agencies for their most basic needs.

Living conditions in Wau’s Protection of Civilians (PoC) site are cramped – it is the most densely populated of the six PoC sites in South Sudan. There are 39,165 internally displaced persons (IDPs) sheltering on just 200,000 m2 of land - 5 m2 per person, well below the Sphere standard of 30 m2 per person. St. Mary’s cathedral is equally cramped, with a surge in new arrivals in April 2017 adding further pressure. Some 8,800 internally displaced South Sudanese currently live on the grounds of the cathedral. 

As the rainy season approaches, drainage is vitally important to ensure sanitary living conditions for the displaced. UNICEF and partners are working on sanitation, hygiene and drainage in the PoC site. A cholera outbreak has reached many parts of South Sudan, and staff in the camp are working on preventing the spread of disease i
22
Nov

Uplifting Women and Girls Is the Key to Solving the World’s Problems

By Mansi Mehta, Manager, Global Cause Partnerships

Prevent gender-based violence in South Sudan:

On February 20, 2017, famine was declared in South Sudan, deepening the already existing humanitarian crisis in the region. Today, more than 2 million people have been displaced by violence in South Sudan. Of those fleeing the conflict, 87 percent are women and children, meaning 1.3 million children need our help to protect their childhood.

Women and children are facing immediate risks of violence, displacement, life-threatening diseases and hunger. In addition to this, Details

Manar, 34 years old, buying winter clothes for her children at a shop in Za’atari camp with the cash support from UNICEF.
20
Nov

Solving Problems That Seem Too Big

When the temperatures recently dropped, I enjoyed an evening curling up by the fire to read to my family after filling our bellies with great food (happily, my husband does most of the cooking).  Warmth, shelter, safety, food, family connection. These are simple pleasures in life that I know not to take for granted and I know that other Dining for Women members don’t either. Details

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14
May

A conversation with One Acre Fund

In August 2009, Dining for Women granted $18,437 to a small non profit providing support to farmers in Rwanda. Today, that program has grown from serving 25,000 farmers in two countries to a projected 305,000 farmers by the end of this year in four countries. We had a conversation with Briehan Lynch of the One Acre Fund to find out how they did it and to talk about the impact of our investment in them. This is the first in a series of Impact Hangouts to re-connect with past programs.  Details

drawing by Bou Nai Heang
4
Dec

Surviving rape in Cambodia

We invited some of our programs that deal directly with violence against women to share some stories. The stories show the impact these programs are having fighting violence against women, addressing their root causes, and providing support and a way back for its victims. This is the story of a young Cambodian teen-ager, whose name has been changed, who was helped through this tragic experience by Lotus Outreach’s aftercare and reintegration program — a Dining for Women sustained program. 
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4
Dec

Of 4 sisters, 2 walk a different path

We invited some of our programs that deal directly with violence against women to share some stories. The stories show the impact these programs are having fighting violence against women, addressing their root causes, and providing support and a way back for its victims. This is the story of a young Kenyan girl who was spared the traditional female genital mutilation and sent instead to study at the Kakenya Center for Excellence.  Details

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4
Dec

Violence changed this child’s life, but won’t define it

We invited some of our programs that deal directly with violence against women to share some stories. The stories show the impact these programs are having fighting violence against women, addressing their root causes, and providing support and a way back for its victims. This is the story of a young Kenyan girl who knew the horrors of domestic violence at an extremely early age. Her mother was murdered by her father, who then abandoned Naanyu and her five siblings. Taken in by family, she is studying at the Kakenya Center for Excellence where she has learned that her life will not be the same as for others in her village. FGM will not be performed on her.  Details

Former Kamlari at sewing class
9
Aug

Moving beyond kamlari in Nepal

The Nepal Youth Foundation was our featured program in January 2012. Dining for Women funded the Indentured Daughters Program, which, with the official abolition of kamlari, has become the Empowering Freed Kamlaris program. We recently saw an inspiring television report on their success and asked for an inside look. This update on the organization’s efforts and the photos and success stories show the tremendous impact we can all have. Details