change
GarrityOConnell
26
Apr

Grant Selection Committee Chair Transition

DFW is grateful for the service of Susan Garrity, who is retiring from our Grant Selection Committee (GSC). Susan has been in service to women and girls through her work with DFW since 2009, when she and three friends started the CA, San Jose-4 chapter, which they still lead.

Susan spent 29 years in Operations and Supply Chain management in the medical device manufacturing world, except for a two-year break during which she attended nursing school and became a Registered Nurse. She also holds a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and a Masters of Business Administration. Details


Member Input Sought for Grants Program

As Dining for Women grows and we raise more money, what will we do with these funds?  At this time, here is what we know:

  1. The monthly Featured Grants Program will continue.
  2. Impact partnerships, such as the one with the Peace Corps’ Let Girls Learn Program, are a way for us to proactively invest in issues in order to make a substantial impact on equality for women and girls. These strategic partnerships will be an integral part of our overall Grants Program going forward.
  3. Sustained Funding Grantees have been selected through May 2018.  Beyond May 2018, we would like to research different funding options.
  4. We know that there are many different ways of granting funds to make substantial impact on the world.

Details

BethEllen_Marsha
21
Dec

Marsha’s Legacy: Believing in DFW Miracles

As I enter my third year with Dining for Women, I have learned a great deal about this wonderful organization.  I’ve learned from members, staff, and the board, but I have to say that my principal education has come from DFW co-founders Marsha Wallace and Barb Collins. DFW owes its strength, its grace, and its future to these two outstanding women!

As Barb transitions from her Chair role on the board, I am grateful for her tenacity and her leadership.  She leaves a legacy of great governance and a forward-thinking board.  She has painstakingly placed the groundwork for DFW’s future  – one that we can all be proud of! I look forward to continuing to work with her as she remains on the board and will chair the Resource Development Committee. Details

Passing the Baton
23
Nov

Passing the Baton

Dining for Women became a way of life for me after the first chapter meeting at Marsha’s home in January 2003.  Her simple idea turned traditional philanthropy upside down, forever changing my expectations for the impact of my charitable donations.

Our collective giving and educational model is proving that small contributions and individual actions, when aggregated together, make a deep and transformational impact in the lives of both the giver and receiver.  One person can change the way the world works.

Dining for Women belongs to all of us. It’s never been more important for each of us to nurture the organization, to listen and unify our actions, even when our 400 plus chapters are spread throughout our country, and the women and girls we touch are spread throughout the world. Details

Board of Directors
29
Jun

The Evolution of DFW’s Board

The gravitation to Dining for Women’s philanthropic model is evidence of the power of collective action. In the last decade, giving circles have emerged as a driving force for social impact. Dining for Women is a powerhouse, blending traditional nonprofit values with those of a grassroots movement. We are the largest giving circle globally — with 400 chapters — focused on women and girls.

In 2005, the New Ventures in Philanthropy Initiative first studied 70 giving circles in this highly-engaged and flexible form of philanthropy.  Dining for Women was one of those circles. Since then, several studies have been published, including New Ventures follow-up studies in 2007 and 2009, all validating the increasing popularity of collective, engaged giving. According to leading expert, Dr. Angela Eikenberry, a new study is under way which will be looking closely at long-term implications, and has identified up to 1,000 circles in the U.S. Details